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Child Growth and Development

Child Growth and Development:  Physical Appearance and Growth

From the American Academy of Pediatrics, Your Baby’s First Year, 3rd Edition,

By Steven P. Shelov, MD, MS, FAAP

The First Month

Appearance and Growth

By the end of the first month your baby will be much more responsive and alert to his/her surroundings. Your baby’s hand, eye, and body coordination will be much greater as well. Most babies about 1/10th of their birth weight during the first five days and regain it back. By about ten days after, they have rapidly regained back to their original birth weight. The average newborn gains weight about 20 to 30 grams per day and weighs 10 pounds by the first month. Note that boys tend to weigh more and slightly be longer than girls.

Baby’s body will gradually straighten out from the tightly curled position that he/she held while inside the mother’s womb. If your baby was born vaginally and the skull appeared misshaped, then it will soon resume to its normal shape. Baby acne is normal and you may see pimples break out on the baby’s face. This usually appears during the 4th or 5th week of life. If your baby does develop baby acne then use a soft clean receiving blanket and place it under his/her head while the baby is awake. Gently wash baby’s face once a week with mild baby soap. Somewhere around ten day to three weeks after birth, the stump from the umbilical cord should have dried out and fallen off. Occasionally, a raw spot is left after the stump has gone. Make sure to keep it dry and clean by using a cotton ball dipped in rubbing alcohol. It will soon heal itself within two weeks, but if it doesn’t then consult your pediatrician.

Newborn Reflexes

Below are some normal inborn reflexes that your baby may perform during the first weeks of life. Be aware that not all newborns will acquire and lose these particular reflexes at the exact same time. This table is to give you a general insight of what to expect regarding these reflexes.

Reflex

Age When Reflex Appears

Age When Reflex Disappears

Moro Reflex

Birth

2 Months

Walking/Stepping

Birth

2 Months

Rooting

Birth

4 Months

Tonic Neck Reflex

Birth

5 to 7 Months

Palmar Grasp

Birth

5 to 6 Months

Plantar Grasp

Birth

9 to 12 Months

Early Brain Development

During the 1st years of life, research shows that the brain grows and develops significantly, patterns of thinking, and responding are established. By knowing this, it’s important for parents to help their baby develop appropriately through social, physical, and cognitive development throughout the baby’s entire life. A baby’s first days, months, and years have a huge impact on how the brain develops. Studies show that children need certain elements during the early stages of life to grow and develop to the fullest potential by recognizing:

  • A child needs to feel special, loved, and valued.
  • A child needs to feel safe.
  • A child needs to feel confident about what to expect from her environment.
  • A child needs guidance.
  • A child needs a balanced experience of freedom and limits.
  • A child needs to be exposed to a diverse environment filled with language, play, exploration, books, music, and appropriate toys.

States of Consciousness

There are six states of consciousness that your baby cycles through several times a day. Two of them are sleep states and the others are waking states. State one is deep sleep and state two is active sleep where baby is undergoing light sleep and noises will begin to startle and awaken baby.

States

Description

What Your Baby Does

One

Deep Sleep

Lies quietly without moving

Two

Light Sleep

Moves while sleeping; startles at noises

Three

Drowsiness

Eyes start to close & may doze

Four

Quiet Alert

Eyes open wide, face is bright, & body is quiet

Five

Active Alert

Face and body move actively

Six

Crying

Cries, may scream, & body moves in disorganized ways

Movement Milestones by the End of the 1st Month

  • Baby will make jerky and quivering arm thrusts.
  • Baby will bring hands within range of eyes and mouth.
  • Baby will move his/her head from side to side while lying on stomach.
  • Baby’s head will flop backward if unsupported.
  • Baby keeps hands in tight fists.
  • Baby will have strong reflex movements.

Visual Milestones by the End of the 1st Month

  • Baby focuses eye sight from eight to twelve inches away.
  • Baby eyes will wander and occasionally cross.
  • Baby prefers black and white or high contrast patterns.
  • Baby prefers the human face to all other patterns.

Hearing Milestones by the End of the 1st Month

  • Baby’s hearing is fully mature.
  • Baby recognizes some sounds.
  • Baby may turn toward familiar sounds and voices.

Smell & Touch Milestones by the End of the 1st Month

  • Baby prefers sweet smells.
  • Baby avoids bitter or acidic smells.
  • Baby recognizes the scent of his/her own mother’s breast milk.
  • Baby prefers soft to coarse sensations.
  • Baby will dislike rough or abrupt handling.

Developmental Health Watch

It’s important to watch out for any signs of these developmental health problems. If your baby shows any signs of the following developmental delays, then notify your pediatrician immediately. Below is a list of developmental health delays to keep an eye out for:

  • Sucks poorly and feed slowly
  • Baby doesn’t blink when shown a bright light.
  • Baby doesn’t focus and follow a nearby object moving side to side.
  • Baby rarely moves arms and legs and may seem stiff.
  • Baby seems excessively loose in the limbs or be floppy.
  • Baby’s lower jaw trembles constantly, even when not crying or excited.
  • Baby doesn’t respond to loud sounds.

Appropriate Toys

  • Mobile with highly contrasting colors and patterns.
  • Unbreakable mirror attached securely to inside of crib.
  • Music players with soft music.
  • Soft, brightly colored and patterned toys that make gentle sounds.

Vitamin D Benefits

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all children should take vitamin D of at least 400 IU starting soon after birth. This is based on recent research that the level of vitamin D can be given safely to babies. Vitamin D helps children strengthen their immune system and prevents certain diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

Feeding Difficulties

Too Much Feeding Occurs When:

  • A bottle fed baby has consumed more than four to six ounces per feeding.
  • Baby vomits most or all the food after a complete feeding.
  • Baby stools are loose and very watery for eight or more times per day.

Too Little Feeding Occurs When:

  • A breast fed baby stops feeding after ten minutes or less.
  • Baby wets fewer than four diapers per day, may urinate less, and become mildly dehydrated.
  • Baby has infrequent or very hard stools.
  • Baby appears hungry and searching for something to suck shortly after feedings.
  • Baby becomes more yellow instead of less during the first week.

Feeding Allergy or Digestive Disturbance:

  • Baby vomits most or all the food after a complete feeding.
  • Baby produces loose and very watery stools eight or more times a day or has blood in the stools.
  • Baby has a severe skin rash.

One Month to Three Months of Age

Appearance and Growth

By this age your baby will have shown his/her first true smile. Between one and four months olds will go from a totally dependent newborn to a very active and responsive infant. The baby will start to acquire more voluntary control of his/her body. Baby will begin to become interested in his/her surroundings and want to inspect everything in sight. Your baby will also start to sleep longer for longer periods of time during naps and at bedtime; which will give you the opportunity to sleep more as well.

Baby will continue to grow at the same rate as discussed during the first few weeks of life with growth spurts and pauses in growth along the way. At one month, baby’s head will flop backward when gently pulling him/her up in an upright position. At two months of age, the soft spots on the baby’s head will still be open and flat, tends to be a little chubby, and be able to focus and move at the same time. At three months of age, the soft spot on the back of baby’s head should now be closed. By four months, your baby will be able to hold his/her head and chest up as baby supports himself/herself on the elbows.

Movement Milestones by the End of Three Months

  • Baby raises head and chest when lying on stomach.
  • Baby supports upper body with arms when lying on stomach.
  • Baby stretches legs out and kicks when lying on stomach or back.
  • Baby is able to open and shut hands.
  • Baby is able to push down on legs when feet are placed on a firm surface.
  • Baby is able to bring hands to mouth.
  • Baby is able to take swipes at dangling objects with hands.
  • Baby is able to grasp and shake hand toys.

Visual Milestones by the End of Three Months

  • Baby watches faces intently.
  • Baby is able to follow moving objects.
  • Baby is able to recognize familiar objects and people at a good distance.
  • Baby is able to start using his/her hands and eyes in coordination.

Hearing and Speech Milestones by the End of Three Months

  • Baby is able to smile at the sound of your voice.
  • Baby begins to babble.
  • Baby begins to imitate some sounds.
  • Baby is able to turn his/her head toward the direction of the sound.

Emotional / Social Milestones by the End of Three Months

  • Baby begins to develop a social smile.
  • Baby enjoys playing with other people and may cry when the playing stops.
  • Baby becomes more communicative and expressive with his/her face and body.
  • Baby is able to imitate some movements and facial expressions.

Developmental Health Watch

It’s important to watch out for any signs of these developmental health problems. If your baby shows any signs of the following developmental delays, then notify your pediatrician immediately. Below is a list of developmental health delays to keep an eye out for:

  • Baby still has Moro reflex after four months.
  • Baby doesn’t seem to respond well to loud sounds.
  • Baby doesn’t notice his hands by two months old.
  • Baby doesn’t smile at the sound of your voice by two months old.
  • Baby doesn’t follow moving objects with his/her eyes by two to three months old.
  • Baby doesn’t grasp and hold objects by three months old.
  • Baby doesn’t smile at people by three months old.
  • Baby is unable to support his head well at three months old.
  • Baby doesn’t reach for and grasp toys by three to four months old.
  • Baby doesn’t babble by three to four months old.
  • Baby doesn’t bring objects to his/her mouth by four months old.
  • Baby begins to babble, but doesn’t try to imitate any of your sounds by four months old.
  • Baby doesn’t push down with his legs when his/her feet are placed on a firm surface by four months old.
  • Baby has trouble moving one or both eyes in all directions.
  • Baby crosses his eyes most of time (occasionally crossing of the eyes is normal in these first months).
  • Doesn’t pay attention to new faces, or seems very frightened by new faces or surroundings.
  • Baby still has the tonic neck reflex at four to five months.

Appropriate Toys and Activities

  • Images or books with high contrast patterns
  • Bright, varied mobile
  • Unbreakable mirror attached to the inside of the crib
  • Rattles
  • Signing to your baby
  • Playing varied music from music boxes, CDs, records, or tapes

Stimulating Infant Brain Growth

  • Provide healthful nutrition as your baby grows.
  • Have periodic checkups and timely immunizations from a regular source of medical care.
  • Give consistent, warm, physical contact like hugging, skin-to-skin, body-to-body contact in order to establish your baby’s sense of security and well being.
  • Use simple lively phrases and address your baby by his/her name.
  • Respond to baby gestures, facial expressions, and sounds that he/she makes.
  • Be attentive to your baby’s rhythms and moods.
  • Learn to read baby cues and respond when he/she gets upset or happy.
  • Provide colorful objects of different shapes, sizes, and textures that baby can play with.
  • Show children picture books and family photographs to baby.
  • You face is the most interesting thing to your baby at this age. Play a fun game like peek-a-boo with your baby.
  • Place a child safe mirror in your infant’s crib so he/she can look at his/her own face.
  • Parents who speak a foreign language should use it at home.
  • Avoid subjecting your baby to stressful or traumatic experiences, physical or psychological issues.
  • Make sure other care givers who care for your baby understands the importance of forming a loving and comfortable relationship with your child and also provides same consistent care.

Four to Seven Months of Age

Appearance and Growth

As a parent, you now have a good idea of your baby’s feeding, napping, bathing, and bedtime. This daily routine will provide security and flexibility to help you budget your time wisely among various activities. Your baby is able to better communicate emotions and desires more frequently by crying when she wants a new toy to play with, when you leave the room, hungry, wet, uncomfortable, and to strangers who come to close. Between four and seven months, your baby will continue to gain approximately 1 to 11/4 pounds a month. By eight months of age your baby will weigh about two and a half times more than what she did at birth. During these months your baby’s length will increase by about two inches.

Movements Milestones by the End of Seven Months

  • Baby is able to roll both ways from front to back and back to front.
  • Baby sits with, and then without, support of hands.
  • Baby supports her whole weight on her legs.
  • Baby reaches with one hand.
  • Baby transfers object from hand to hand.
  • Baby uses raking grasp (not pincer).

Appropriate Toys

  • Unbreakable mirror attached to inside of crib or playpen.
  • Soft balls, including some that make soft pleasant sounds.
  • Textured toys that make sounds.
  • Toys that have finger holds.
  • Musical toys, such as bells, maracas, tambourines, and so forth. Make sure the musical toy parts can not come off or loose.
  • See through rattles that show pieces making the noise.
  • Old magazines with bright pictures for the parent to show the child.
  • Baby books with board, cloth, or vinyl pages.

Vision Milestones by the End of Seven Months

  • Baby develops full color vision.
  • Baby develops distance vision matures.
  • Baby ability to track moving objects improves.

Language Milestones by the End of Seven Months

  • Baby responds to own name.
  • Baby begins to respond to “no”
  • Baby distinguishes emotions by tone of voice
  • Baby responds to sound by making sounds
  • Baby uses voices to express joy and displeasure
  • Baby babbles chains of consonants

Cognitive Milestones by the End of Seven Months

  • Baby finds partially hidden objects.
  • Baby explores with hands and mouth.
  • Baby struggles to get objects that are out of reach.

Developmental Health Watch

It’s important to watch out for any signs of these developmental health problems. If your baby shows any signs of the following developmental delays, then notify your pediatrician immediately. Below is a list of developmental health delays to keep an eye out for:

  • Baby seems very stiff with tight muscles.
  • Baby seems very floppy like a rag doll.
  • Baby’s head still flops back when body is pulled up to a sitting position.
  • Baby reaches with one hand only.
  • Baby refuses to cuddle.
  • Baby shows no affection for the caregiver.
  • Baby doesn’t seem to enjoy being around people.
  • Baby has one or both eyes consistently turn in or out.
  • Baby has persistent tearing, eye drainage, or sensitivity to light.
  • Baby does not respond to surrounding sounds.
  • Baby has difficulty getting objects to mouth.
  • Baby does not turn her head to locate sounds by four months.
  • Baby doesn’t roll over in either direction from front to back or back to front by five to seven months.
  • Baby seems inconsolable at night after five months.
  • Baby doesn’t smile spontaneously by five months.
  • Baby cannot sit with help by six months.
  • Baby doesn’t laugh or make squealing sounds by six months.
  • Baby doesn’t actively reach for objects by six to seven months.
  • Baby doesn’t follow objects with both eyes at near and far ranges by seven months.
  • Baby doesn’t bear some weight on legs by seven months.
  • Baby doesn’t try to attract attention through actions by seven months.
  • Baby doesn’t babble by eight months.
  • Baby shows no interest in games of peek-a-boo by eight months.

Social / Emotional Milestones by the End of Seven Months

  • Enjoy social play.
  • Interested in mirror images.
  • Responds to other people’s expression of emotion and appears joyful often.

Stimulating Infant Brain Growth

  • Provide a stimulating and safe environment where your baby can begin to explore and roam freely.
  • Give consistent, warm, and physical contact to establish your infant’s sense of security and well-being.
  • Be attentive to your baby’s rhythms and moods.
  • Respond when baby is upset and happy.
  • Talk and sing to your baby during dressing, bathing, feeding, playing, walking, and driving to build up baby’s language skills.
  • Encourage your child in face-to-face talk and mimic sounds to show interest.
  • Read books to your child on a daily basis.
  • Parents who speak a foreign language should use it at home.
  • Engage in rhythmic movements with your child such as dancing along with music.
  • Avoid subjecting your baby to stressful or traumatic experiences, physical, or psychological issues.
  • Introduce and let your child interact with other children and parents.
  • Encourage your child to reach for toys to stimulate eye and hand coordination and motor skills.
  • Make sure the caregiver understands the importance of forming a loving and comforting relationship with your child.
  • Encourage your child to begin to sleep for extended periods of time throughout the night. Always remember to ask for help to the pediatrician whenever necessary.
  • Spend time on the floor playing with your child every day.
  • Choose quality care that includes affection, responsiveness, educational, and safety. Provide positive care giving.

Eight Months to Twelve Months of Age

Appearance and Growth

Your baby is growing rapidly and every baby grows at his/her own rate. By the child’s first birthday, the average child has tripled his/her birth weight and is 28 to 32 inches tall. The typical head size of an eight month old is 171/2 inches in circumference and by one year old the baby’s head is 18 inches. Baby will be sitting up without any support at eight months of age, scooting on their bottoms, or slithering on their stomachs. Later, your baby will be able to crawl and learn to walk after he/she feels secure enough to stand. “The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly urges parents not to use baby walkers and recommend using stationary walkers or activity centers that do not have wheels, but seats that rotate and bounce.” A sturdy wagon or kiddy push cart works well, too.

Movement Milestones by the End of Twelve Months

  • Baby gets to a sitting position without assistance.
  • Baby crawls forward on belly by pulling with arms and pushing with legs.
  • Baby assumes hands-and-knees position.
  • Baby creeps on hands and knees supporting trunk on hands and knees.
  • Baby gets from sitting to crawling or prone position.
  • Baby pulls self up to stand.
  • Baby walks holding on to furniture.
  • Baby stands momentarily without support.
  • Baby may walk two or three steps without support.

Language Milestones by the End of Twelve Months

  • Baby pays increasing attention to speech.
  • Baby responds to simple verbal requests.
  • Baby responds to “no.”
  • Baby uses simple gestures, such as shaking his/her head for “no.”
  • Baby babbles with inflection.
  • Baby learns to say “dada” and “mama.”
  • Baby uses exclamations, such as “oh-oh!”
  • Baby tries to imitate words.

Bilingual Babies

Parents who speak another language besides English shouldn’t be so concerned about your baby getting confused when speaking in two different languages because your baby will learn both languages simultaneously. With time, the two languages will become distinct and separate and the child should be able to communicate in both. Parents should always encourage their child to become bilingual because it’s an asset and skill that will beneficial for the rest of the child’s life.

Cognitive Milestones by the End of Twelve Months

  • Baby explores objects in many different ways baby shaking, banging, throwing, or dropping them.
  • Baby is able to find hidden objects with ease.
  • Baby is able to look at the correct picture when the image is named out loud.
  • Baby is able to imitate gestures.
  • Baby begins to use objects correctly, like drinking from a cup, brushing hair, dialing a phone, or listening to the receiver.

Stimulating Infant Brain Growth

  • Parents should talk to their baby during dressing, bathing, feeding, playing, walking, and driving using adult talk.
  • Try to be attentive to your baby’s rhythms and moods.
  • Respond to baby when he/she is upset or happy.
  • Encourage your baby to play with blocks and other soft toys for hand-to-eye coordination development, fine motor skills, and a sense of competence.
  • Provide a stimulating and safe environment for your baby can explore and roam around.
  • Give consistent warm and physical contact in order to establish a sense of security and well being for the baby.
  • Read to your baby on a daily basis.
  • Parents who speak a foreign language should use it at home.
  • Avoid stressful or traumatic experiences, physical, or psychological issues.
  • Play games like peek-a-boo and patty cake to stimulate your child’s memory skills.
  • Introduce your child to other children and parents.
  • Provide age appropriate toys that are safe and inexpensive.
  • Remember it’s more important to give your child more attention than buying more toys.
  • Teach your baby to wave “bye-bye” and to shake his/her head “yes” and “no.”
  • Make sure other caregivers understand the importance of you forming a loving and comforting relationship with the baby.
  • Learn to respect your baby’s periodic discomfort around people who are not their caregivers.
  • Spend time on the floor playing with your child every day.
  • Choose quality child care that demonstrate affection, are responsive, educational, and provide safety measures for all children.
  • Parents should always visit their child’s child care provider more frequently to share ideas about positive care giving.

Social / Emotional Milestones by the End of Twelve Months

  • Baby might be shy or anxious with strangers.
  • Baby cries when mom and dad leaves the room.
  • Baby enjoys imitating people in play.
  • Baby shows specific preference for certain people and toys.
  • Baby tests parental responses to his/her actions during feeding time.
  • Baby tests parental responses to his/her behavior.
  • Baby may be fearful in some situations.
  • Baby prefers mom, dad, and/or other caregiver over anyone else.
  • Baby repeats sounds or gestures for attention.
  • Baby is able to finger feed himself or herself.
  • Baby extends arm or leg to help when being dressed.

Appropriate Toys

  • Stacking toys in different sizes, shapes, and colors.
  • Cups, pails, and other unbreakable containers.
  • Unbreakable mirrors of various sizes.
  • Bath toys that float, squirt, or hold water.
  • Large building blocks.
  • “Busy boxes” that push, open, squeak, and move to keep baby busy.
  • Squeeze toys.
  • Large dolls and puppets.
  • Cars, trucks, and other vehicle toys made of flexible plastic and no sharp edges or removable parts to choke or harm baby in any way.
  • Balls of different sizes and not too small to fit in the baby’s mouth.
  • Cardboard books with large pictures.
  • CDs, tapes, music boxes, and musical toys.
  • Push and/or pull toys.
  • Toy telephones.
  • Paper tubes, empty boxes, old magazines, egg cartons, empty plastic soda/juice/milk bottles that are well washed before use.

Developmental Health Watch

It’s important to watch out for any signs of these developmental health problems. If your baby shows any signs of the following developmental delays, then notify your pediatrician immediately. Below is a list of developmental health delays to keep an eye out for:

  • Baby does not crawl.
  • Baby drags one side of the body while crawling for over a month.
  • Baby is unable to stand when supported.
  • Baby does not search for objects that are hidden while he watches.
  • Baby says no single words, like “mama” or “dada.”
  • Baby does not learn to use gestures, such as waving or shaking his/her head.
  • Baby does not point to objects or pictures.

Nutrition

About eight to nine months of age, your baby should be able to eat by using her hands. This would be a good time for the child to practice eating with a spoon of their own, even if he/she plays with it during mealtimes. Once the child has figured out how to use the spoon properly then he or she will be able to dip it in the food and begin feeding themselves without any help from you. It helps to have the child wear a bib, have a wash cloth handy for messes, and a cloth put under the chair to minimize cleanup time. Parents should be patient and resist the erg to reach for the spoon and take it away from the child, because then the child won’t be able to learn how to use a spoon.

Finger foods work really well for babies learning how to eat on their own. Some of these foods include small pieces of steamed veggies, soft fruits like bananas, well cooked pasta, and small pieces of bread, chicken, scrambled eggs, or cereals. It’s also good to introduce a variety of flavors, shapes, colors, and textures. Remember to keep an eye on baby during feeding times so that he or she won’t choke on any food, since the child is likely to swallow without chewing first.

Below you will find sample menu items for a child eight to twelve months old and a one year old. These menus are to be used as a guideline for parents during feeding times when the child is beginning to experience a variety of food choices and practice eating all by themselves. Please read each menu carefully and pay close attention to each serving size.

Sample of a One Day Menu for 8 to 12 Month Old Children

1 cup = 8 ounces (240 ml)

4 ounces = 120 ml

6 ounces = 180 ml

Breakfast

  • ¼ to ½ cup of cereal or mashed egg
  • ¼ to ½ cup of fruit, diced (if your child is self-feeding)
  • 4 to 6 oz. of formula or breast milk

Snack

  • 4 to 6 oz. of breast milk, formula, or water
  • ¼ cup of diced cheese or cooked vegetables

Lunch

  • ¼ to ½ cup of yogurt or cottage cheese or meat
  • ¼ to ½ cup of yellow or orange vegetables
  • 4 to 6 oz. of formula or breast milk

Snack

  • 1 teething biscuit or cracker
  • ¼ cup of yogurt or diced (if child is self-feeding) fruit
  • Water

Dinner

  • ¼ cup of diced poultry, meat, or tofu
  • ¼ to ½ cup of green vegetables
  • ¼ cup of noodles, pasta, rice, or potato
  • ¼ cup of fruit
  • 4 to 6 oz. of formula or breast milk

Before Bedtime

  • 6 to 8 oz. of formula or breast milk
  • Water
  • Brush teeth

This menu is recommended for a one year old child who weighs approximately twenty-one pounds (9.5 kg).

Sample of a One Day Menu for a One Year Old Child

1 teaspoon = ⅓ tablespoon (5 ml)

1 tablespoon = ½ ounce (15 ml)

1 cup = 8 ounces (240 ml)

1 oz. = 30 ml

Breakfast

  • ½ cup of iron fortified breakfast cereal or 1 cooked egg
  • ¼ to ½ cup whole milk (with cereal or without)
  • Fruit can be added to cereal or on its own
  • ½ sliced banana
  • 2 to 3 large sliced strawberries

Snack

  • 1 slice toast or whole wheat muffin with 1 to 2 tablespoons of cream cheese, peanut butter, or yogurt with cut up fruit
  • ½ cup of whole milk

Lunch

  • ½ sandwich sliced turkey or chicken, tuna, egg salad, or peanut butter
  • ½ cup cooked green vegetables
  • ½ cup of whole milk

Snack

  • 1 to 2 ounces cubed or string cheese, or 2 to 3 tablespoons of fruit or berries
  • 1 cup of whole milk

Dinner

  • 2 to 3 ounces of cooked meat, ground or diced
  • ½ cup of cooked yellow or orange vegetables
  • ½ cup of pasta, rice, or potato
  • ½ cup of whole milk

Excellent Source of Iron

  • Read Meats
  • Fortified bran cereal
  • Blackstrap molasses

Good Source of Iron

  • Hamburger
  • Shrimp
  • Potato, baked in skin
  • Dried apricots
  • Lean beef
  • Frankfurter
  • Navy beans
  • Raisins
  • Chicken
  • Egg, egg yolks
  • Kidney beans
  • Prunes, prune juice
  • Tuna
  • Spinach, mustard greens
  • Soybeans
  • Strawberries
  • Ham
  • Asparagus
  • Split peas
  • Tomato juice

Adequate Source of Iron

  • Enriched rice
  • Avocado
  • Broccoli
  • Green peas
  • Enriched pasta, noodles
  • Cranberry juice
  • Tomato
  • Bacon
  • Enriched bread
  • Orange
  • Carrots
  • Peanut butter
  • Banana
  • Apple
  • Green beans

 

Information on this site is intended for Angel Kids Pediatrics patients only. Always consult your doctor before beginning, modifying, or discontinuing any treatment plan.

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